Friday, August 29, 2014

DIY: Reclaimed Wood Paneled Door

diy reclaimed wood paneled door


I want to start off this post by admitting two things right off the bat. I'm going to let it all hang out. Well, not literally. Nobody wants to see that! :)

1.) I did this entire project by myself. Woo hoo! Girl power! (Spice Girls anyone?)

2.) I DID THIS ENTIRE PROJECT BY MYSELF. Physically speaking, this should be more like a "Mike project" (aka. the hubby), or even a two person project. I think I almost broke my back--twice. And I know that when I had to shorten the door… it was a little scary. I was using power tools that I have never used before (I hope my husband is sitting down when he reads this!). However, Mike was in class, and I was bound and determined to do this all by myself. 

So, the whole point of this disclaimer is…. don't do this project by yourself! Adding the amount of reclaimed wood that I used to this door significantly increases its weight. However, it might be a good way to gain muscle in your arms…. hmm… just kidding!

What do you need to start this project? First off, a door that needs a little extra spice! I originally wanted to make this laundry room door a sliding barnwood door, but since I wanted to do this entirely by myself and not spend a dime that option was out of the question. 

One of my favorite blogs is by Jenna Sue Design, and she has an amazing tutorial about doing her own paneled doors. So, I started to chew on this idea, but spun it around with a slightly more rustic twist as well as a zero dollar investment using supplies I had around the house.


diy reclaimed wood paneled door


I then removed the door from the hinges, and also took off the hinges.


diy reclaimed wood paneled door


As well as the door door knobs. 

diy reclaimed wood paneled door


My little helper and I measured the door to see what kind of a design I come up with using the reclaimed wood that I had on hand. Unfortunately it was a lot of shorter then I would have liked, but no worries. I just changed the design to accommodate the shorter lengths, and decided to only use four boards--2 sides, and a top and bottom. Please extra the mess, Ava likes to play "babysitter" with her dolls using our towels. 


diy reclaimed wood paneled door


So, the top and bottom boards will actually go the entire width of the door instead of the typical panel doors that you'll see in stores that have them only extend out to the side pieces.  


diy reclaimed wood paneled door


As you can see, help is always right around the corner. No shortage in that department!

After I cut all of the boards to fit onto the door I screwed them into place. So far, everything has been easy, peasy.

NOTE: If you decide to use reclaimed wood you may have to use more screws than normal due to warping or bowed out pieces. I honestly wouldn't worry about how many screws you use. Just as long as it is secured safely to your door. You can always fill in any "ugliness" with wood putty.


diy reclaimed wood paneled door


I actually debated just leaving the door in this state because I love the difference it has already made. However, there are a lot of holes and random mistakes that needed to be fixed so onward I proceed.


diy reclaimed wood paneled door


As I was leaning the door up against the frame I realized that it wasn't going to fit now. Why? I decided that I didn't like that the door swung into the laundry room, and wanted to switch it around. Well, by doing so there was a difference in floor height now since Mike did not put our laminate flooring in the laundry room. The laundry room flooring was much lower than the living room area. Oops. I definitely didn't think about this factor. 

This is where it got a little scary. I started trying a few different tools to cut this "extra" off of the door. I soon realized that there wasn't any handheld power tools that were strong enough (and with my skill level!) that I could use upstairs. So, my incredibly, brilliant mind decided that I should drag this monstrosity down two flights of stairs to the workshop. ** In case you haven't seen my house before I live in a flood zone which means my house is basically on stilts. See here

Anyways, to make a long story short… the top of the door isn't exactly straight, but thankfully this flaw is on the inside of the door and the paint covers it pretty well. I know. I'm brilliant. Seriously. This is usually about the same timeframe that I start laughing at myself, and start sarcastically saying, "I have a master's degree". Lol.


diy reclaimed wood paneled door


After that fiasco, I brought the door back upstairs to paint. 


diy reclaimed wood paneled door


First, I put wood putty into all of the screw holes, random cracks, spots that didn't line up right, and the hole where the door knob used to be and let them dry up. 


diy reclaimed wood paneled door


I was a little intimidated to paint this door black so I started off with a dark charcoal color. I don't mind the color, but it wasn't what I going for. So, I painted it black. I used an exterior satin latex paint, and thankfully it only took a few coats. 


diy reclaimed wood paneled door


Honestly, the drying process did take awhile. I let it dry overnight just to make sure that it was completely good to go, and then did some touch-ups later on the next day. 

I forgot to take a picture of the hinges while I fixed them, but I sanded them down and spray painted them with my favorite Rust-oleum spray paint color "Oil Rubbed Bronze". Remember: lots of thin coats of paint and plentyyyy of time to dry!


diy reclaimed wood paneled door


After I hooked the door back up to its frame (and tested it out!) I went ahead and painted the backside. 


diy reclaimed wood paneled door


Last, I used a tree branch that I had been saving for the door knob. This room also houses the dogs for the time being so I didn't want this door to latch and hinder them from getting in and out. 

I simply drilled a hole through the door, into the branch and then put my screw in. Make sure it's long enough to fit all three layers! 

Finally, I can enjoy my masterpiece. Awww…. it's so pretty! 


diy reclaimed wood paneled door


diy reclaimed wood paneled door


diy reclaimed wood paneled door

diy reclaimed wood paneled door


Although it was a pain in my butt I have to admit that it was completely worth it! This door has completely transformed this end of the house. It's finally another cohesive element for our home, and one step closer to our dream house. 


diy reclaimed wood paneled door

I hope everyone has a great weekend, and see ya next week :)






Thursday, August 28, 2014

Kitchen Updates: Barnwood Shelves

Hello fellow DIYer's, readers and like to get stuff done(ers)! :) This week Mike and I have been working on shelving in our kitchen. 

Since a.) we have a toddler b.) we have a lot of open space and high ceilings and c.) I have a lot of crap 
it was easily determined that high barnwood shelving would be the way to proceed. 

First though, since all of our floor molding was removed when Mike put in the flooring it was time to put it all back in. So, since we decided to save a few bucks and use the original stuff, but just make a few updates. This is the color of the original molding. Not exactly what we were going for. 


kitchen remodeling


We started off by sanding and painting all of it white to brighten it up. However, the combination of the NC humidity and the stain on the wood crippled our paint job. It wasn't taking the paint very well.


kitchen remodeling


kitchen remodeling


So, what do you do when your paint job isn't working? Distress it! Easy solution, and fits our decor perfectly anyways. It was actually a happy and accidental mistake. 


kitchen updates


 Moving onward, the first barnwood shelf we installed was ginormous! I had Ava stand in front of it so you could see just how flipping huge it is.


barnwood shelves


I'm not sure if you've ever checked out shelving prices before, but they are ridiculous! Thankfully we have a lot of wood on hand (go figure, right?) so we make all of our own. 

The biggest thing to remember is that you will need to support your shelf, and preferably in the studs in the wall. 


barnwood shelves


Using this triangle shape, adding keyhole hangers and then putting drywall anchors into the wall is ideal for ensuring great support for your shelf. Plus, wood shelves are ridiculously heavy. The more support, the better!


barnwood shelves


Determining where to put any shelf is usually the hardest part for me. Since I planned on using an old window we had to make sure that there was enough room to fit it on the shelf so it wouldn't touch the ceiling. 


barnwood shelves


Don't forget to use a level! When I do this by myself I tend to forget this part until it's all done which of course creates more work. Ugh. But you live, and you learn.


barnwood shelves


Woo hoo! One down, two to go… for the time being. :)


barnwood shelves


And of course, we had our afternoon entertainment. Is it just me or does she remind you of Abby off of NCIS? I think it's the hair and roller skates. Adorable.




Then, on the other side of the room Mike started to put up the remaining two shelves. We decided to stagger them this time to add a little bit of variety.


barnwood shelves


barnwood shelves


Then it was time to decorate! I'm thinking I might need to update a little bit along the way, but I love this starting point. 


barnwood shelves


Having plant life on your shelves is definitely a great boost of color, but holy cow is it a pain to water them! Anybody have any tips or DIY watering hoses/cans to use? I'd love to hear how you do it!


barnwood shelves


barnwood shelves


barnwood shelves


Now on the other side, it's a little bit simpler, but I think it suits it very well. Definitely excited about the mixing and matching of these two beauties. I'm not sure if can see it from these pictures, but I'm using two of Mike's old hunting bows behind the other decor. They are kind of long and awkward, but add just enough of the country life appeal that we love. 


barnwood shelves


barnwood shelves


barnwood shelves


Not to mention, I finally found a place for these gorgeous, old gas tank doors. Slowly we're piecing it all together, and our little piece of heaven is finally looking like home.


barnwood shelves


Until next time, have a wonderful week :)



Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Tuesday's Inspiration: Pendant Lighting

Some days I find myself obsessing over one itty-bitty detail in a room. Lately, it's been lighting. I've always been a "frugal Franny", but since I now have the assistance of my uber-talented hubby I've been scouring the pages of any DIY book, magazine or webpage that I can get my hands on to invent (or at least attempt!) a new and interesting rustic decor piece.

I've recently created a DIY hallway light made from an old bucket, and I don't mean to honk my own horn… but it's gorgeous! :) So, now I'm on a mission to design and create unique, beautiful lighting throughout our home. Here's the inspiration that I've been drooling over:


rustic pendant lighting



rustic pendant lighting



rustic pendant lighting



rustic pendant lighting



rustic pendant lighting



rustic pendant lighting



rustic pendant lighting



rustic pendant lighting



rustic pendant lighting



rustic pendant lighting



rustic pendant lighting